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I haven’t made this one in many years because I’m allergic to fireweed pollen and it’s tough to go out and gather the blossoms. This is the most beautiful jelly! It turns a deep magenta color as soon as the lemon juice is added. Give it a try!

  • Fireweed Jelly
  • Yield: 3-1/2 cups
  • 1-1/2 cups tightly packed fireweed blossoms
  • 2-1/4 cup water
  • 2 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 3-1/2 cups sugar
  • 1 envelope Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin

Bring blossoms to a boil in water and simmer until petals lose their color. Drain and measure 1-3/4 cup juice into a large saucepan. Stir in lemon juice. Stir in sugar and mix well.

Bring to a boil over high heat and stir in Certo. Boil, stirring constantly, for one minute. Remove from heat, skim off foam, and ladle into jars.

Wipe the rims of the jars and screw on the lids. Turn the jars upside down for at least thirty minutes (or as long as hours and hours–doesn’t matter). Turn the jars right side up and let cool completely before marking and storing.

Many times it can take more than a day for the jelly to set. Try not to worry. If it really does not set, then you have a nice batch of syrup or you can try to process it again. I have never done that, I just go the syrup route. C’est la vie.

Notes: I usually, not always, use Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin for my jelly. The recipe booklet that I use is from 1975 when the liquid pectin came in bottles. Now the pectin comes in sealed envelopes and each envelope is equivalent to one half-bottle. My recipe booklet is falling apart. The new recipe sheet that comes inside the packages now isn’t as comprehensive as the old one. I do not water-bath can my jelly. There is enough sugar in it to act as a preservative. Using canning lids keeps air from getting in. When I was a child, my mother only used melted paraffin to cover the jelly and many people still do it that way.

  • This is how I prep for a jelly-making session
  • Set out enough sanitized jars and rings to match the yield of the recipe, either pints, cups, or half-cups.
  • Put the appropriate number of lids into a small saucepan of water over low heat.
  • Set out my canning funnel, a ladle, metal serving spoon, and small dish.
  • Cut open the envelope of Certo and set it in the small dish.
  • [The small dish is for the foam (which is just as delicious as the jelly, only foamy)]

Here is another one based upon a recipe found in Oded Schwartz’s Preserving (DK Publishing, 1996). I had a hard time waiting the month called for in the recipe, because it was SO good right out of the pan.

  • Peach Marmalade
  • Yield: 2 pints
  • 2-1/2 lb. firm, just ripe, peaches
  • 4 cups sugar
  • Juice of 2 lemons

Peel peaches, remove pits, and cut into thick slices. Put the peach slices in a LARGE saucepan and stir in sugar and lemon juice. Mix well. Cover the pan and let stand for 2-3 hours.

Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer gently for 20 minutes, or until the peaches are just soft.

Return to a boil and boil rapidly, stirring frequently for 20-25 minutes, or until jelling point is reached (220 degrees F on a candy thermometer). Remove pan from heat and skim off foam. Ladle into jars.

Wipe the rims of the jars and screw on the lids. Turn the jars upside down for at least thirty minutes (or as long as hours and hours–doesn’t matter). If the fruit is floating, shake the jars to redistribute. It’s okay to do this several times over a few hours. Turn the jars right side up and let cool completely before marking and storing. This makes a soft-set marmalade that is ready to eat in about one month, but improves with age.

This recipe comes out of St. John’s Lutheran ALCW Cookbook (1982, Donnelly, Minnesota). I used to make it every year, but the quantities are more than I can use now.

  • Rhubarb Marmalade
  • Yield: 7 pints
  • 9 cups rhubarb, chopped
  • 8 cups sugar
  • 16-20 oz. can crushed pineapple
  • 3 oranges (remove 2/3 of pith and then grind the pulp and the peel)
  • 1 large (or 2 small) boxes red JELLO (NOT sugar-free)

Mix together all ingredients, except JELLO, in a very large non-corrosive bowl. Mine was a 32-cup Tupperware. Let it stand overnight. Pour into a LARGE saucepan. Bring to a boil and let simmer for 20 minutes. Stir in JELLO and mix well. Let it come to a boil again. Ladle into jars.

Wipe the rims of the jars and screw on the lids. Turn the jars upside down for at least thirty minutes (or as long as hours and hours–doesn’t matter). Shake the jars occasionally if you see the fruit is floating in order to redistribute it back into the jam. Turn the jars right side up and let cool completely before marking and storing.

I usually, not always, use Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin for my jam. The recipe booklet that I use is from 1975 when the liquid pectin came in bottles. Now the pectin comes in sealed envelopes and each envelope is equivalent to one half-bottle. As you can see, my recipe booklet is falling apart. The new recipe sheet that comes inside the packages now isn’t as comprehensive as the old one. I do not water-bath can my jam. There is enough sugar in it to act as a preservative. Using canning lids keeps air from getting in. When I was a child, my mother only used paraffin to cover the jam and many people still do it that way.

  • This is how I prep for a jam-making session
  • Set out enough sanitized jars and rings to match the yield of the recipe, either pints, cups, or half-cups.
  • Put the appropriate number of lids into a small saucepan of water over low heat.
  • Set out my canning funnel, a ladle, metal serving spoon, and small dish.
  • Cut open the envelope of Certo and set it in the small dish.
  • [The small dish is for the foam (which is just as delicious as the jam, only foamy)]
  • Blueberry Jam
  • Yield 9-1/2 cups (6 lb.)
  • 4-1/2 cups prepared fruit (about 1-1/2 quarts fully ripe blueberries)
  • 2 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 7 cups (3 lb.) sugar
  • 2 envelopes Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin

Thoroughly crush, one layer at a time, about 1-1/2 quarts blueberries. Measure 4-1/2 cups into a very LARGE saucepan. Stir in lemon juice. Stir in sugar and mix well.

Over high heat, bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; at once stir in Certo. Skim the foam off with a metal spoon. Continue to stir and skim. Ladle into jars, leaving 1/2″ room at the top.

Wipe the rims of the jars and screw on the lids. Turn the jars upside down for at least thirty minutes (or as long as hours and hours–doesn’t matter). If the fruit is floating, give the jars a shake every once in awhile. Turn the jars right side up and let cool completely before marking and storing.

Many times it can take more than a day for the jam to set. Try not to worry. If it really does not set, then you have a nice batch of syrup or you can try to process it again. I have never done that, I just go the syrup route. C’est la vie.

I usually, not always, use Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin for my jam. The recipe booklet that I use is from 1975 when the liquid pectin came in bottles. Now the pectin comes in sealed envelopes and each envelope is equivalent to one half-bottle. As you can see, my recipe booklet is falling apart. The new recipe sheet that comes inside the packages now isn’t as comprehensive as the old one. I do not water-bath can my jam. There is enough sugar in it to act as a preservative. Using canning lids keeps air from getting in. When I was a child, my mother only used paraffin to cover the jam and many people still do it that way.

  • This is how I prep for a jam-making session
  • Set out enough sanitized jars and rings to match the yield of the recipe, either pints, cups, or half-cups.
  • Put the appropriate number of lids into a small saucepan of water over low heat.
  • Set out my canning funnel, a ladle, metal serving spoon, and small dish.
  • Cut open the envelope of Certo and set it in the small dish.
  • [The small dish is for the foam (which is just as delicious as the jam, only foamy)]
  • Strawberry or Blackberry or Dewberry or Boysenberry or Youngberry Jam
  • Yield 8 cups (5 lb.)
  • 4 cups prepared fruit (about 2 qt. fully ripe berries)*
  • 7 cups (3 lb.) sugar
  • 1 envelope Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin

First, prepare fruit. Crush completely, one layer at a time, about 2 quarts fully ripe berries. (If desired, sieve half of pulp to remove some of the seeds.) Measure 4 cups into a very LARGE saucepan. *(With strawberries, or other berries lacking tartness, use 3-3/4 cups fruit and add 1/4 cup lemon juice.) Stir in sugar and mix well.

Over high heat, bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; at once stir in Certo. Skim the foam off with a metal spoon. Continue to stir and skim. Ladle into jars, leaving 1/2″ room at the top.

Wipe the rims of the jars and screw on the lids. Turn the jars upside down for at least thirty minutes (or as long as hours and hours–doesn’t matter). If the fruit is floating, give the jars a shake every once in awhile. Turn the jars right side up and let cool completely before marking and storing.

Many times it can take more than a day for the jam to set. Try not to worry. If it really does not set, then you have a nice batch of syrup or you can try to process it again. I have never done that, I just go the syrup route. C’est la vie.

I usually, not always, use Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin for my jelly. The recipe booklet that I use is from 1975 when the liquid pectin came in bottles. Now the pectin comes in sealed envelopes and each envelope is equivalent to one half-bottle. As you can see, my recipe booklet is falling apart. The new recipe sheet that comes inside the packages now isn’t as comprehensive as the old one. I do not water-bath can my jelly. There is enough sugar in it to act as a preservative. Using canning lids keeps air from getting in. When I was a child, my mother only used paraffin to cover the jelly and many people still do it that way.

  • This is how I prep for a jelly-making session
  • Set out enough sanitized jars and rings to match the yield of the recipe, either pints, cups, or half-cups.
  • Put the appropriate number of lids into a small saucepan of water over low heat.
  • Set out canning funnel, ladle, metal serving spoon, and small dish.
  • Cut open the envelope of Certo and set it in the small dish.
  • [The small dish is for the foam (which is just as delicious as the jam, only foamy)]
  • Currant Jelly: Yield 7-1/4 cups (5-1/2 lb.)
  • 5 cups prepared juice (about 4 lb. fully ripe red currants)
  • 7 cups (3 lb.) sugar
  • 1 envelope Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin

First, prepare juice. Crush about 4 lb. (3 quarts) fully ripe red currants. Add 1 cup water; bring to a boil and simmer, covered, 10 minutes. Place in jelly bag; squeeze out juice. Measure 5 cups into a very LARGE saucepan. Add sugar and mix well.

Place over high heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. At once stir in Certo. Then bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat, skim off foam with a metal spoon, and pour quickly into jars.

Wipe the rims of the jars and screw on the lids. Turn the jars upside down for at least thirty minutes (or as long as hours and hours–doesn’t matter). Turn the jars right side up and let cool completely before marking and storing.

Many times it can take more than a day for jelly to set. Try not to worry. If it really does not set, then you have a nice batch of syrup or you can try to process it again. I have never done that, I just go the syrup route. C’est la vie.

I could eat this peach jam out of the jar with a spoon, and have done so! I haven’t tried the pear jam, but it’s the same recipe so I included it in case you want to try it. One time the local grocery store was selling cases of bruised cooking peaches for a very low price. I thought I had died and gone to heaven. We had peachy desserts for quite a few days, along with this delicious peach jam.

  • Peach or Pear Jam
  • Yield: 9 cups (5-1/2 lb.)
  • 4 cups prepared fruit (about 3 lb. fully ripe peaches or pears)
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice
  • 7-1/2 cups (3-1/4 lb.) sugar
  • 1 envelope Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin

First, prepare fruit. Peel and pit fully ripe peaches; core fully ripe pears. Grind or chop very fine. Measure 4 cups into a very LARGE saucepan. Add lemon juice. Stir in sugar and mix well.

Place over high heat, bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; at once stir in Certo. Skim off foam with a metal spoon. Ladle into jars, leaving 1/2″ headspace.

Wipe the rims of the jars and screw on the lids. Turn the jars upside down for at least thirty minutes (or as long as hours and hours–doesn’t matter). If the fruit is floating, give the jars a shake every once in awhile. Turn the jars right side up and let cool completely before marking and storing.

Notes: I usually, not always, use Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin for my jam. The recipe booklet that I use is from 1975 when the liquid pectin came in bottles. Now the pectin comes in sealed envelopes and each envelope is equivalent to one half-bottle. As you can see, my recipe booklet is falling apart. The new recipe sheet that comes inside the packages now isn’t as comprehensive as the old one. I do not water-bath can my jam. There is enough sugar in it to act as a preservative. Using canning lids keeps air from getting in. When I was a child, my mother only used paraffin to cover the jam and many people still do it that way.

  • This is how I prep for a jam-making session
  • Set out enough sanitized jars and rings to match the yield of the recipe, either pints, cups, or half-cups.
  • Put the appropriate number of lids into a small saucepan of water over low heat.
  • Set out my canning funnel, a ladle, metal serving spoon, and small dish.
  • Cut open the envelope of Certo and set it in the small dish.
  • [The small dish is for the foam (which is just as delicious as the jam, only foamy)]

What do you do with this? Well, it goes good with lamb and also makes a beautiful presentation in Thumbprint Cookies at Christmastime, along with Raspberry Jam or Currant Jelly.

  • Fresh Mint Jelly
  • Yield: 3-1/4 cups (2-1/2 lb.)
  • 1-3/4 cups mint infusion (1-1/2 cups fresh mint)
  • 2 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • Green food coloring (optional)
  • 3-1/2 cups (1-1/2 lb.) sugar
  • 1 envelope Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin

First, prepare mint infusion. Wash 1-1/2 cups firmly packed mint leaves and stems. Place in a large saucepan and crush with a masher or glass. Add 2-1/4 cups water and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover, and let stand 10 minutes. Strain. Measure 1-3/4 cups into saucepan. Add lemon juice and a few drops of green food coloring if you decided to use it. Stir in sugar and mix well.

Place over high heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. At once stir in Certo. Then bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat, skim off foam with a metal spoon, and pour quickly into jars.

Wipe the rims of the jars and screw on the lids. Turn the jars upside down for at least thirty minutes (or as long as hours and hours–doesn’t matter). Turn the jars right side up and let cool completely before marking and storing.

Many times it can take more than a day for the jelly to set. Try not to worry. If it really does not set, then you have a nice batch of syrup or you can try to process it again. I have never done that, I just go the syrup route. C’est la vie.

I usually, not always, use Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin for my jelly. The recipe booklet that I use is from 1975 when the liquid pectin came in bottles. Now the pectin comes in sealed envelopes and each envelope is equivalent to one half-bottle. My recipe booklet is falling apart. The new recipe sheet that comes inside the packages now isn’t as comprehensive as the old one. I do not water-bath can my jelly. There is enough sugar in it to act as a preservative. Using canning lids keeps air from getting in. When I was a child, my mother only used paraffin to cover the jelly and many people still do it that way.

  • This is how I prep for a jelly-making session
  • Set out enough sanitized jars and rings to match the yield of the recipe, either pints, cups, or half-cups.
  • Put the appropriate number of lids into a small saucepan of water over low heat.
  • Set out my canning funnel, a ladle, metal serving spoon, and small dish.
  • Cut open the envelope of Certo and set it in the small dish.
  • [The small dish is for the foam (which is just as delicious as the jelly, only foamy)]

I usually, not always, use Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin for my jam. The recipe booklet that I use is from 1975 when the liquid pectin came in bottles. Now the pectin comes in sealed envelopes and each envelope is equivalent to one half-bottle. As you can see, my recipe booklet is falling apart. The new recipe sheet that comes inside the packages now isn’t as comprehensive as the old one. I do not water-bath can my jam. There is enough sugar in it to act as a preservative. Using canning lids keeps air from getting in. When I was a child, my mother only used paraffin to cover the jam and many people still do it that way.

  • This is how I prep for a jam-making session
  • Set out enough sanitized jars and rings to match the yield of the recipe, either pints, cups, or half-cups.
  • Put the appropriate number of lids into a small saucepan of water over low heat.
  • Set out my canning funnel, a ladle, metal serving spoon, and small dish.
  • Cut open the envelope of Certo and set it in the small dish.
  • [The small dish is for the foam (which is just as delicious as the jam, only foamy)]
  • Rhubarb Jam
  • Yield: 6-1/4 cups (4 lb.) jam
  • 3 cups prepared fruit (about 2 lb. rhubarb)
  • 5-1/2 cups (2 lb. 6 oz.) sugar
  • 1 envelope Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin

First, prepare fruit. Slice thin or chop about 2 pounds rhubarb. Put the rhubarb into a medium saucepan, add 3/4 cup water, and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to simmer, covered, until the rhubarb is soft — about 1 minute. Measure 3 cups into a LARGE pan. Add sugar to pan and mix well.

Over high heat, bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; at once stir in Certo. Skim the foam off with a metal spoon. Continue to stir and skim. Ladle into jars, leaving 1/2″ room at the top.

Wipe the rims of the jars and screw on the lids. Turn the jars upside down for at least thirty minutes (or as long as hours and hours–doesn’t matter). If the fruit is floating, give the jars a shake every once in awhile. Turn the jars right side up and let cool completely before marking and storing.

Many times it can take more than a day for the jam to set. Try not to worry. If it really does not set, then you have a nice batch of syrup or you can try to process it again. I have never done that, I just go the syrup route. C’est la vie.

I usually, not always, use Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin for my jam. The recipe booklet that I use is from 1975 when the liquid pectin came in bottles. Now the pectin comes in sealed envelopes and each envelope is equivalent to one half-bottle. My recipe booklet is falling apart. The new recipe sheet that comes inside the packages now isn’t as comprehensive as the old one. I do not water-bath can my jam. There is enough sugar in it to act as a preservative. Using canning lids keeps air from getting in. When I was a child, my mother only used paraffin to cover the jam and many people still do it that way. I have heard that you should not increase the recipe and/or cut the amount of sugar, something about cooking time and setting and preserving. So, stick to the recipe.

  • This is how I prep for a jam-making session
  • Set out enough sanitized jars and rings to match the yield of the recipe, either pints, cups, or half-cups.
  • Put the appropriate number of lids into a small saucepan of water over low heat.
  • Set out my canning funnel, a ladle, metal serving spoon, and small dish.
  • Cut open the envelope of Certo and set it in the small dish.
  • [The small dish is for the foam (which is just as delicious as the jam, only foamy)]
  • Rhubarb-Strawberry Jam
  • Yield: 6-1/4 cups (4 lb.) jam
  • 3-1/2 cups prepared fruit (about 1 lb. rhubarb and 1 quart strawberries)
  • 6-1/2 cups (2 lb. 6 oz.) sugar
  • 1 envelope Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin

Slice one pound rhubarb and put into saucepan. Add 1/4 cup water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and let simmer until rhubarb is soft, about 1 minute. Thoroughly crush about 1 quart fully ripe strawberries. Mix the fruits together and measure out 3-1/2 cups. Place the fruit in a LARGE pan. Add sugar to pan and mix well.

Over high heat, bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; at once stir in Certo. Skim the foam off with a metal spoon. Continue to stir and skim. Ladle into jars, leaving 1/2″ room at the top.

Wipe the rims of the jars and screw on the lids. Turn the jars upside down for at least thirty minutes (or as long as hours and hours–doesn’t matter). If the fruit is floating, give the jars a shake every once in awhile. Turn the jars right side up and let cool completely before marking and storing.

Many times it can take more than a day for the jam to set. Try not to worry. If it really does not set, then you have a nice batch of syrup or you can try to process it again. I have never done that, I just go the syrup route. C’est la vie.