You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘salmon’ tag.

I’ve made this dish several times over the past couple years and it’s really, really delicious. My recipe is based upon one found at TamingTwins, but I’ve modified it quite a bit.

This dish is how I use my leftover salmon that’s already cooked. I haven’t tried it, but I believe canned salmon would work as well. We eat a lot of sweet potatoes because they purportedly are lower in carbs than regular potatoes, but that may just be an advertising ploy by sweet potato growers. Sweet potatoes are commonly called yams in the USA, but real yams are an entirely different vegetable originating in Africa or Asia and most of us have probably never eaten or seen one. That aside, if you’re at the grocery store shopping for yams, almost assuredly they are selling you sweet potatoes. Go ahead and get the yams.

This recipe’s proportions are basically eyeballed. I’ll give you my ingredient proportions, but do feel free to wing it with a handful of this or that. You’ll see. I tend to start by choosing a baking dish that I can spread a layer of flaked salmon evenly across the bottom. The next layer is prawns and onion that has been cooked in milk. TamingTwins poached her salmon with onion in the milk, but I like to use my leftover salmon that’s already cooked. However you decide to do things, the purpose is to flavor the milk with seafood. The next layer is the shrimp and onion-flavored milk made into a white sauce. The next layer is the mashed sweet potatoes mixed with grated cheddar cheese. You can cook the sweet potatoes however you like, they just need to end up mashed. The last layer is grated cheese over the top. This dish is like a shepherd’s pie, but maybe we should call it a fisher’s pie. It may not look like much, but it’s super yummy.

  • Ingredients
  • 2-3 Sweet potatoes (yams)
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 cup grated cheddar cheese, divided
  • Cooked salmon, at least two serving pieces
  • 1-1/2 cups milk
  • 1/2 onion, chopped
  • 5 Prawns (extra-large), peeled, deveined, and rough chopped
  • 3 Tbsp. butter
  • 3 Tbsp. flour
  • 1 Tbsp. parsley flakes (optional)

Peel and cut the sweet potatoes into large pieces. Put them into a pot with an inch or so of water and boil/steam until the sweet potatoes are soft. Mash them and then stir in a dash of salt and pepper and 1/3 cup grated cheese. Set aside.

Debone and flake the salmon. Spread it evenly across the bottom of a baking dish. I used a 2-quart dish. Set aside.

Bring milk with onion to a boil in a saucepan and let simmer for a couple minutes until the onion is cooked. Stir in the prawns. Let simmer until they’re cooked. It won’t take long at all, a minute or two. Strain out the onion and prawns, making sure to save the milk. Spread the onions and prawns across the salmon in the baking dish. Set aside. Let the milk cool to room temperature or less. It was zero degrees here while I was last making this, so I just strained the milk into a measuring cup and set it outside to cool. Didn’t take long. Ha.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Make a roux by melting butter in a small saucepan and stirring in the flour, salt, and pepper over medium heat. Stir in the cooled milk and continue stirring over medium heat until the sauce is thick and bubbly. Remove from heat and stir in the parsley flakes, if using (I didn’t have any). Pour the sauce over the seafood in the baking dish.

Dollop mashed sweet potatoes evenly over the filling in the baking dish. You can smooth it out or fluff it up, however you like. Sprinkle with remaining 2/3 cup grated cheese.

Bake at 350 degrees F for 30-40 minutes, until heated through. Heavenly!

I baked this one for thirty minutes, but it could have used another 5-10 in the oven. I was too hungry to wait!

Smoked Salmon

This smoked salmon method is really what most people know as kippered salmon. There is no liquid added, it is a dry brine, very sweet.

Work with salmon fillets. Cut the fillets across into strips about 1” wide.

Work with salmon fillets. Cut the fillets across into strips about 1” wide.

In a large bowl, mix together 6 cups brown sugar and 1 cup salt. You can adjust the total amounts as long as you remember it’s 5 or 6 parts of brown sugar to 1 part salt. I use canning and pickling salt.

In a large bowl, mix together 6 cups brown sugar and 1 cup salt. You can adjust the total amounts as long as you remember it’s 5 or 6 parts of brown sugar to 1 part salt. I use canning and pickling salt.
In a bucket or other container, layer sugar-salt mix with salmon.

One layer at a time until all your fish is used up. Make sure sugar-salt is the top layer. Loosely cover and place in a cool spot for 24 hours or so. I put the bucket on the floor of my basement.

The salt draws out the moisture in the fish so that when you remove the lid the next day, the fish is floating in liquid. Take the bucket to your work area (my kitchen table).

The salt draws out the moisture in the fish so that when you remove the lid the next day, the fish is submerged in liquid. Take the bucket to your work area (my kitchen table).

Draw a bowl of cool water and dip each piece of salmon into it, then place onto baking sheets covered with absorbent towels. Once all the fish is laid out, pat the tops dry with absorbent cloths.

Draw a bowl of cool water and dip each piece of salmon into it, then place onto baking sheets covered with absorbent towels. Once all the fish is laid out, pat the tops dry with absorbent cloths.

Let the fish sit, under a fan is best, for several hours while a skin develops. Beads of moisture should emerge from the fish, but don’t worry about it if it doesn’t.

Let the fish sit, under a fan is best, for several hours while a skin develops. Beads of moisture should emerge from the fish, but don’t worry about it if it doesn’t.

P1040345

P1040346

Put the fish onto racks in your smoker and smoke as manufacturer suggests. We like mesquite chips.

Put the fish onto racks in your smoker and smoke as manufacturer suggests. We like mesquite chips. This part takes us about 3 hours or so.

P1040352

Our smoker runs hot and it’s easy to burn it, so keep a close eye.

The finished product. Now we will vacuum seal some and can some. We did about 15 sockeye salmon in this batch. There were a lot of small ones.

The finished product. Now we will vacuum seal some and can some. We did about 15 sockeye salmon in this batch. There were a lot of small ones.

This recipe is not posted on FoodNetwork.com, but it’s from Guy Fieri’s Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives show which can be seen on the Food Network. You can watch the Youtube video if you search for “The Fly Trap in Michigan and Guy Fieri.”

All quantities are eyeballed . . .

Salmon Burgers

In a food processor put:

About 1.5# raw salmon, bones removed, cut into 1” cubes

2 Tbsp. black sesame seeds

¼ cup chopped green onion

2 Tbsp. soy sauce

1 Tbsp. sambala (it’s a spicy Asian condiment—use your own judgement—easy to find, very common)

Form into patties and fry in a little olive oil until done.

Serve on toasted (and perhaps buttered) buns with Aioli Sauce (ingredients follow) and sliced cucumber, sprouts, tomato, cabbage, whatever.

 Aioli Sauce: Mayo, lime juice, garlic powder, Dijon mustard. Mix together.

Put salmon chunks with into food processor.

Add green onions, soy sauce, black sesame seeds, sambala. Whir until well mixed.

Form into patties. If you occasionally wet your hands, the fish won’t stick to them as much.

Fry in a little olive oil.

Serve on a buttered, toasted bun with Aioli Sauce and favorite veges (cabbage, lettuce, tomato, cucumber). My favorite is English cucumber slices and tomato.