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I have made these for many years. The recipe is based on one found in an old Bear Valley Elementary School cookbook: Bear Fare 1993-1994. The original recipe calls for a streusel topping, but I’ve never added that. Too much fuss. Mostly, I make these and toss them into the freezer to eat later. The other day I had about a cup of leftover sweet potatoes, a couple old wrinkled apples, and two leftover egg yolks. I’ll give you this substitute recipe at the end, but just know that’s what’s pictured here.

  • Ingredients
  • 2-1/2 cups flour
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 Tbsp. pumpkin pie spice (I used 1 tsp. cinnamon, 1/2 tsp. ground cloves, 1/4 tsp. allspice, 1/4 tsp. ground ginger, 1/4 tsp. ground cardamom)
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 cup cooked and mashed or solid-pack canned pumpkin
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 cups peeled and finely chopped apples
  • Cinnamon for sprinkling (optional)

Prepare 18-24 muffin cups with paper liners or by greasing. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Combine dry ingredients in a large bowl and set aside. In a smaller bowl combine the eggs, pumpkin, and vegetable oil. Add these liquid ingredients to the large bowl of dry ingredients and stir until just moistened. Fold in the apples. Spoon batter into prepared muffin tins. Sprinkle with cinnamon (optional). Bake 25-35 minutes until muffin tops spring back when lightly pressed with a finger.

Substituting sweet potatoes: I used approximately a cup of mashed sweet potato instead of pumpkin. I tried using 1 egg and 2 egg yolks, but the batter was not completely moistened, so I added a second whole egg. I’m not sure if this was because sweet potato is drier than pumpkin or what. Next time I’ll use 3 whole eggs.

So, in December I purchased a tortilla press . . . and a tortilla warmer . . . and a bag of Bob’s Red Mill Masa Harina . . . and some parchment paper pre-cut into rounds. I realize I was purchasing my own Christmas present, but I’m quite happy with it. I try never to buy anything that only has one use and discourage others from buying them for me. I don’t know what got into me, but I’ve found a place to stow it so it’s all good. Both the recipes found below here are gluten-free. I guess I better say that the Sope recipe below does not require a press or any special equipment. I only used the press for tortillas.

There’s a grocery store in Palm Springs, California called Cardenas and it is like heaven on earth. You can smell the fresh tortillas from the in-store factory. I once filled up a large cooler with fresh produce purchased at Cardenas for about 17 USD and the same produce would have cost me around 100 USD here in Anchorage. Cardenas is a magical place. It reminds me of the big covered markets you see in Mexico full of sights and smells. It’s always hard for me to decide whether to get something they’ve already cooked at the Deli counter or buy the ingredients and make the dishes myself. I usually do both. It drives my mother crazy, “Why are these rice and beans in my refrigerator? What are you going to do with them?” I answer her that by the time I go back home, I’ll have eaten all of it.

My husband took this picture to show the joyous market called Cardenas.

Corn Tortillas

I used the recipe from Isabel Eats. Her tortillas get nice brown marks on them, but I couldn’t get mine to do that. My tortillas were still quite fabulous, so I’m thinking it doesn’t matter? The first two times I made these I used Bob’s Red Mill Golden Corn Flour Masa Harina. It’s very yellow with a grainy texture. The third time I made these, I ran about 1/2 cup short of Bob’s and made it up with Maseca Instant Corn Masa Flour. The color is white and the texture is fine, like cake flour. It threw me off, but I sallied forth and came up with a delicious product. A word about Masa Harina: it is ground corn that has been processed with lime (not lime fruit, but lime stone). According to web sources, ground corn is not the same and will not work the same. You need to use Masa Harina.

  • Ingredients
  • 2 cups Masa Harina
  • 1-1/2 cups hot water
  • 1/2 tsp. salt

Makes 12 tortillas, about 6″ diameter. Stir the ingredients together until it’s a smooth ball. Cover with a damp kitchen towel and let sit for an hour. Divide the dough into twelve pieces (about 2″ in diameter) and roll each piece into a ball. Keep the dough balls covered with the damp kitchen cloth as much as possible.

As I said earlier, I use parchment paper rounds, top and bottom, to keep my dough from sticking to the press. Most people cut slits in two gallon-size plastic bags and put one bag on the top and one on the bottom. I haven’t tried that yet. Place a dough ball slightly off-center on the parchment on the press and place the second parchment round on it. Flatten the dough ball slightly with your hand and then lean on the body of the press to flatten more. Finish off by pressing on the handle. Be mindful not to break the shear pin that attaches the handle to the body. Pushing down on the body of the press should do most of the work.

I have an old non-stick griddle and heated it thoroughly over medium-high heat. I sprayed it with non-stick spray and carefully lay the tortilla to fry. I left it for about thirty seconds and then turned it over. I do not want crispy tortillas. I want them soft and easy to manipulate.

My process was to roll a piece into a ball, press it, and put it on the griddle. While that was cooking, I’d press the next one, etc. A dozen tortillas took me about 50 minutes. I’m usually trying to do too many things at once, so it probably could have gone much faster if this was all I had to do. As they were cooked, I put them into my tortilla warmer.

The first time I made these, I used them to make Shrimp Enchiladas. What a glorious flavor! Oh my, oh my! There is just no comparison to store-bought tortillas. My second tortilla-making venture I made tacos with leftover Cuban Pork Roast and grated cheese. The third time I did this, I used more of the leftover Cuban Pork Roast and made enchiladas.

Sopes

I had bought the Sopes from Cardenas one time, but I wouldn’t know where to purchase something like that here. That is to say I did know what my end-product was supposed to look like. This recipe comes from Kristin at Yellow Bliss Road. I looked all over the web and Pinterest and found a lot of Sopes recipes, but they all called for a lot of finagling. Most of them say to press the dough, lightly fry them, then turn up the edges and deep-fry them. Oh, please. No, thank you. It’s hard enough just cooking things once! Kristin’s recipe does not require a press and she only cooks them once. While I was doing this I thought I had made a huge mistake and I would never, ever make them again. I’d have a perfect disc with a lip and then it would stick to my hand and tear. Oy! Keep your hands as wet as possible. HOWEVER, once they were finished, I realized they were darn near perfect and incredibly delicious. I WILL make these again.

  • Ingredients
  • 1-1/2 cups Masa Harina
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • Cooking oil (My skillet had about 3/4″ in it)
  • Toppings like refried beans, shredded or ground meat, cheese, salsa, lettuce, avocado, tomato, onion, sour cream (whatever strikes your fancy)

Makes about 9 Sopes, approximately 3″ diameter. Stir all ingredients, except cooking oil, together to form dough. Heat the cooking oil over medium high heat until a drop of water sizzles when it touches. Divide dough into golf-ball sized portions and roll into ball shapes. Keep remaining dough balls covered with a damp kitchen towel while working with the others. Using your hands, press each dough ball into a disc of about 1/4″ to 1/2″ thick. Pinch the edges of the disc to form a lip.

If you keep your hands wet, you’ll have greater success forming the discs and the lips. Place the disc, lip side up, in the hot oil and let fry for a little while. Try to get a brown spot on the bottom. Carefully flip the disc over onto the lip and let fry a little longer. I thought this would be a huge mess and fall apart, but it hardens fairly quickly in the oil and becomes easy to get a spatula underneath. You could probably even use tongs. Your goal is to have a crispy edge, but a soft center. Remove from oil and place on paper towels to drain. I did three Sopes at a time in my frying pan and it didn’t take long at all.

These are now ready to serve, and if you’re using cold toppings like lettuce, sour cream, or tomato, you’re done. I spread a tablespoon of warm refried beans over the bottom of each Sope and then spread warm leftover Cuban Pork Roast over that and sprinkled with grated Sharp Cheddar Cheese on top. Then I popped them into the oven at 400 degrees for about 5-10 minutes until the cheese melted. These were heavenly delicious. I topped them with sliced fresh jalapenos and salsa. They were easy to eat by hand. I see this being a hearty game-day snack.

This recipe comes from fixfeastflair.com. I love the look of these and they taste amazing. That being said, I’d like to see a fluffier roll as these seem a bit dense to me. I’m probably doing something wrong. But it’s all good!

  • Dough Ingredients
  • 1 cup warm milk, heated to 110 degrees F
  • 1 envelope (2-1/4 tsp.) active dry yeast
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 3-1/4 cups flour (I use bread flour)
  • 1 tsp. ground cardamom
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 5 Tbsp. butter, softened

In the bowl of a stand mixer, pour milk and sprinkle yeast over the top of the milk. Stir in a teaspoon of brown sugar. Let activate for about 10 minutes. Stir in the remaining brown sugar, about 2 cups flour, ground cardamom, salt, and butter. Using the dough-hook attachment, mix for several minutes to build up the gluten, scraping the bowl down every so often. Add flour a half-cup at a time until the dough comes away from the side of the bowl and is smooth to the touch. Let rise in a warm place until the dough is doubled, at least an hour.

  • Filling ingredients
  • 4 Tbsp. butter, softened
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1-1/2 tsp. ground cardamom

While the dough is rising mix together the filling ingredients into a spreadable paste. Also prepare two or three baking sheets with parchment paper or Silpats.

Once it’s risen acceptably, punch the dough down and roll out on a floured surface into a rectangle 21″ by 13″. Spread the filling over all the dough, all the way to the edges.

Fold the long side of the dough evenly into thirds toward the center (each third is 7″). Run the rolling pin over to compress slightly. Turn the dough so that the open ends are on the right and left sides. Starting at either left or right, cut the dough into thin strips. When finished, you should have 15 to 20 strips. Please go look at fixfeastflair.com to see how to do this next part. She’s got a gif that shows how to make the rolls. You take each strip and roll it around your hand, making sure the ends are firmly tucked underneath.

Set the rolls on the prepared baking pans and cover with plastic or a kitchen cloth. Let rise for about 30 minutes. The pictures are showing two different times I baked these, so don’t let that throw you off. I did it the same both times.

  • Topping Ingredients
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1 Tbsp. sugar
  • 1/2 Tbsp. ground cardamom

While the rolls are rising on the pans, in a small saucepan mix together water and brown sugar. Bring to a boil and remove from heat. Stir in vanilla extract. Set aside. In a small dish, stir together 1 Tbsp. sugar and 1/2 Tbsp. ground cardamom. Set aside.

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Bake rolls for 8 to 10 minutes or until quite brown and baked through completely (don’t burn them, however).

While they’re still hot, brush with topping syrup and then sprinkle with sugar mixture. Remove to rack to cool. Serve while warm. Or not. These are so, so yummy!

Bran-OatMuffins1

I’ve made these for years and years. I don’t remember where the recipe came from. They are super simple to make and take no time at all. Many times I combine the dry ingredients in a bowl the night before, prepare the muffin pan with papers, and set my oven to come on at 375 degrees fifteen minutes before my morning wake-up alarm goes off. Then in the morning I add the three wet ingredients, distribute the batter into the prepared pan, pop them into the oven to bake while I shower, and have a tasty breakfast all ready for the day.

I’ve probably used every kind of dried fruit imaginable in these, and quite a few different frozen fruits, too. Today’s batch I threw in a handful of dried cranberries and a handful of frozen lingonberries. Yum!

Ingredients:

1-1/2 cups flour
1 cup bran cereal FLAKES (NOT All-Bran)
1 cup rolled oats
1/2 cup brown sugar, firmly packed
1-1/2 tsp. baking soda
1-1/4 cups buttermilk
1 large egg
1/4 cup butter, melted
Optional: handfuls of dried, frozen or fresh fruit

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Prepare a muffin tin by greasing or using paper liners. I use liners for easy clean-up. In a large bowl, stir together the dry ingredients. In a small bowl stir together the buttermilk, egg, and melted butter. Make a well in the center of your dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients in. Stir until just combined. Batter will be thick and lumpy. Fold in optional fruit. Spoon batter evenly into prepared muffin pan. Bake at 375 degrees F for 20-23 minutes, until they spring back when lightly touched. Makes 12. These freeze very well.

Bran-OatMuffins2

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This recipe is based upon one found at foodess.com. They are a nice, homey fall treat.

The Dough:

3/4 cup milk, warmed
2-1/4 tsp. active dry yeast
1/2 cup + 1 tsp. sugar
3/4 cup butter, softened
3 eggs
1 cup pumpkin puree
6 cups flour
Oil, for the bowl

In the bowl of a stand mixer with the dough hook attachment add milk, yeast, and 1 tsp. sugar. Stir it around a bit with a long spoon. Let stand about 10 minutes, until frothy. Stir in remaining sugar, butter, eggs, and pumpkin puree. Add about 3 cups flour and run the mixer for about 5 minutes to build the gluten. Add flour in 1/2 to 1 cup increments, running the mixer in between additions, until the dough comes away from the side of the mixing bowl and forms a ball. It should spring back when touched and it should not be sticky. Don’t add too much flour or your bread will be dry and crumbly. Experience teaches you how it should feel at this stage.

Recipes always tell you to put the dough in an oiled, or greased, bowl and turn the dough over to make sure the top is also greased so that the cover will not stick to the dough while it is rising. I never do this. I just remove the dough hook and leave the dough in the mixer. I pop a cover (either plastic wrap or usually a silicone cover) on it and let rise. Prepare the filling while the dough is rising by mixing together the brown sugar and spices.

The Filling:

1 cup butter, softened
1-1/4 cup brown sugar
1-1/2 Tbsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. ground ginger
1/2 tsp. ground nutmeg
1/4 tsp. ground cloves

Let dough rise until doubled in volume, a couple hours. Punch dough down. Turn dough onto a floured surface and roll into a rectangle about 1/8″ thick.

Prepare 2 9×13″ baking dishes by spraying with non-stick oil or greasing them.

Spread the dough with softened butter, to the edges of the dough. Sprinkle evenly with the brown sugar spice mixture.

Roll the dough from the long edge to form a log. Cut the log in half, then cut each half into 15 even-sized pieces. Place 15 pieces into each baking dish in three rows of 5. Cover each baking dish with a towel or plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place until doubled in volume, another hour or so.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Gently remove covers and brush rolls with milk. Bake for 20-25 minutes until golden brown, but still soft.

The Icing:

4 oz. cream cheese
1/4 cup butter, softened
1 cup powdered sugar
1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
4-6 Tbsp. buttermilk, or milk

Beat all ingredients, except buttermilk, until fluffy. Add buttermilk a tablespoon at a time until you get a good consistency for spreading. Ice the rolls however you like to do it. Pictured here I daubed each roll with a bit of icing.

Of course these finished rolls are best if served while still warm and the icing just oozes. Oh my goodness!

Note that I fit a slab of nine of these rolls into a freezer bag one time, before I frosted them. They froze well and were re-warmed deliciously.

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RaisinBread1ONE

Recipe:

1-1/2 cups milk

1 cup raisins

1 cup water

2 pkg active dry yeast (4-1/2 Tbsp.)

½ cup sugar

3 eggs

1 tsp salt

½ cup butter, melted

8 cups bread flour

2 Tbsp. milk

¾ cup sugar

2 Tbsp. ground cinnamon

2 Tbsp. melted butter

Warm the 1-1/2 cups milk until it just starts to bubble (either microwave or stovetop). Stir in the raisins. Let this start cooling while preparing other parts.

Warm the water and stir in the yeast and the ½ cup sugar. Let sit while the yeast activates and it froths. I do this in my KitchenAid mixture. Mix in the eggs, salt, and butter. Stir in the warm, not hot, milk with raisins. Add about 4 cups of flour and run the machine to build the gluten for about 5 minutes. Gradually add the remaining flour until it’s smooth and elastic. Place the dough in a very large greased bowl and turn it over so that the top of the dough is greased and the plastic wrap won’t stick to it. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise until doubled.

Roll dough out on a lightly floured surface about 1/2 inch thick. Moisten dough with 2 Tbsp. milk. Mix together ¾ cup sugar and 2 Tbsp. cinnamon. Sprinkle across top of moistened dough. Roll up lengthwise tightly; so it’s about 3 inches in diameter.* Cut the roll into thirds. Tuck under the ends. Place rolls into greased 9×5 inch loaf pans with the seam at the bottom. Spray the tops of the loaves lightly with oil (or don’t). Let rise again for an hour.

Bake at 350 degrees (175 degrees C) for 45 minutes, or until loaves are lightly browned and sound hollow when knocked. Remove loaves from pans and brush with melted butter. Let cool before slicing.

*Note: As you can see from the pictures, my loaves split. They still had that beautiful swirl for each slice and tasted great, but I believe a looser roll might have alleviated the splitting problem. Next time! And next time I’ll try to remember to snap a picture of a slice.

RaisinBread2TWO

Warm the 1-1/2 cups milk until it just starts to bubble (either microwave or stovetop). Stir in the raisins. Let this start cooling while preparing other parts. Warm the water and stir in the yeast and the ½ cup sugar. Let sit while the yeast activates and it froths. I do this in my KitchenAid mixture. Mix in the eggs, salt, and butter. Stir in the warm, not hot, milk with raisins. Add about 4 cups of flour and run the machine to build the gluten for about 5 minutes. Gradually add the remaining flour until it’s smooth and elastic. Place the dough in a very large greased bowl and turn it over so that the top of the dough is greased and the plastic wrap won’t stick to it. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise until doubled.

RaisinBread3THREE

Roll dough out on a lightly floured surface about 1/2 inch thick.

RaisinBread4FOUR

Moisten dough with 2 Tbsp. milk. Mix together ¾ cup sugar and 2 Tbsp. cinnamon. Sprinkle across top of moistened dough.

RaisinBread5FIVE

. Roll up lengthwise tightly; so it’s about 3 inches in diameter.* Cut the roll into thirds. Tuck under the ends. Place rolls into greased 9×5 inch loaf pans with the seam at the bottom. Spray the tops of the loaves lightly with oil (or don’t). Let rise again for an hour.

RaisinBread6SIX

Bake at 350 degrees (175 degrees C) for 45 minutes, or until loaves are lightly browned and sound hollow when knocked. Remove loaves from pans and brush with melted butter. Let cool before slicing.

RaisinBread7SEVEN

*Note: As you can see from the pictures, my loaves split. They still had that beautiful swirl for each slice and tasted great, but I believe a looser roll might have alleviated the splitting problem. Next time!

Hummus & Pita

The hummus recipe is based upon one found here.

Hummus Recipe

1 16 oz can garbanzo beans

1/4 cup liquid from can of garbanzo beans

4 tablespoons lemon juice

1 1/2 tablespoons tahini

2 cloves garlic, crushed

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons olive oil

Drain garbanzo beans and set aside liquid from can. Combine remaining ingredients in blender or food processor. Add 1/4 cup of liquid from garbanzos. Blend for a few minutes on low until thoroughly mixed and smooth.

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Place in serving bowl, and create a well in the middle. Pour a small amount of olive oil into the well.
Serve with pita bread.

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The pita bread recipe is based upon one found at Under The High Chair.

Pita Bread Recipe

1 tablespoon yeast
1 ¼ cup warm water
1 teaspoon salt
3- 3 ½ cups flour

Dissolve yeast in warm water in the bowl of an electric mixer. Add salt and 1 ½ cups flour. With the dough hook, beat well to make a batter. Add additional flour until a rough, shaggy mass is formed. Let it knead for about 8 minutes until dough is smooth and elastic. Add more flour if it is too sticky. The dough will rise AFTER you’ve formed the flat loaves. Go straight to forming now.

Turn dough onto a lightly floured surface and divide into six pieces for large pitas or ten for smaller. Form dough into balls, then flatten with a rolling pin into ¼ inch thick discs. Try and keep an even thickness as this is what helps them puff. Note: Do not roll out on parchment paper or let them rest on parchment paper in an effort not to use too much flour. They stick! Flour is the way to go. Flour them.

Let rest on the floured surface 30-40 minutes until slightly puffy. By the time you are finished forming the last one, you may be quite close to starting to bake the first one. Get your oven going. It takes time.

Preheat oven AND baking sheet to 425F. Let the baking sheet sit inside the hot oven for about ten minutes after the preheating is finished. That baking sheet needs to be HOT! A high-quality (thicker) baking sheet will retain heat longer, but will take longer to heat at the beginning. I could totally be making that up, but I believe it.

With a large spatula, flip a well-floured round of dough upside down on the dry baking sheet. Bake 10-15 minutes until it’s puffed and light golden. I baked mine one at a time letting the baking sheet heat thoroughly between batches. I think two at a time would work, too.

If you have children or adult science buffs in the room, be prepared! Watching pita bread puff in the oven is really, really cool! A crowd could gather if you have a window in your oven door. Just sayin’. Learn to shout, “Step away from the oven now so I can remove the pita before it burns.”

I’m not telling you how to save your leftovers because these are so amazingly delicious that you will not have any leftovers.

Slice in half cross-wise and stuff with yummy sandwich ingredients or pile gyro ingredients on the top or slice into pie-shaped sections to serve as an appetizer with hummus. It’s all good!

Irish Soda Bread

Well, I’ve missed an entire month! Life happens. Here is one of my all-time favorite breads, based upon Sunset Breads (Lane Publishing 1984). I should have posted it at St. Patrick’s Day as that is when I usually make this, but life interfered then, too. Ha!

Irish Soda Bread Recipe

4 to 4-1/2 cups flour

1 tsp. salt

3 tsps. Baking powder

1 tsp. baking soda

¼ cup sugar

1/8 tsp. cardamom or coriander (optional)

¼ cup firm butter

1 egg

1-3/4 cups buttermilk

In a large bowl, stir together 4 cups flour, salt, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, and cardamom (if used) until thoroughly blended. Cut in butter with a pastry blender or 2 knives until crumbly, In a separate bowl, beat egg lightly and mix with buttermilk; stir into dry ingredients until blended. Turn out onto a floured board and knead until smooth (2 to 3 minutes).

Divide dough in half and shape each half into a smooth, round loaf; place each loaf in a greased 8” cake or pie plan and press to make dough fill pans. With a razor blade or sharp floured kife, cut a 1/2” deep cross in top of each loaf.

Bake in a preheated 375 degree oven (350 degrees for glass pans) for 35 to 40 minutes or until nicely browned. Makes 2 loaves.

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Stir dry ingredients together, then cut in butter. Mix in liquid ingredients. Remove to flour-covered board and briefly knead.

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Divide in half and place into two greased pans.

Cut a cross in the top of each loaf with a floured knife.

Cut a cross in the top of each loaf with a floured knife.

Bake at 375 degrees for 35-40 minutes or until nicely browned. Served warm, it's awesome!

Bake at 375 degrees for 35-40 minutes or until nicely browned. Served warm, it’s awesome!

 

HamburgerBuns

I split and toasted these with butter, then piled on the pulled pork with barbecue sauce and sauteed sweet peppers. Oh, yummy!

Hamburger Buns Recipe

1 Tbsp. yeast (1 pkg)

1 cup warm water

2 Tbsp. oil

2 Tbsp. sugar

1 egg

1 tsp. salt

3 cups bread flour (apx)

Egg Wash (1 egg yolk mixed with 2 Tbsp. water)

Sesame seeds

Dissolve yeast in warm water. Add oil and sugar. Let sit for a few minutes. Stir in egg, salt, and 2 cups flour. Stir and stir and stir. Gradually add enough flour to make a dough stiff enough to handle. Knead well. Once it is smooth and elastic, place into greased bowl and cover. Let rise until doubled. Remove from bowl and cut dough into 8 equal pieces. If you are making sliders, cut into 15 pieces. Roll each piece into a ball and then flatten. Place on greased baking sheet (I fit all of mine onto one sheet, but I should have used two.). Let rise until doubled. This second rise will take about an hour. Carefully brush each bun with egg wash. Sprinkle buns with sesame seeds. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes. Sliders should take about 10 minutes.

Hamburger Buns

These are the fluffiest, most delicious dinner rolls. The recipe is based upon one found in Taste of Home’s Oct/Nov 2000 issue. The original recipe calls for using a 15-oz. can of cut sweet potatoes, drained and mashed. I use a fresh sweet potato, cook it, and then let it cool a bit before adding to the recipe. I just eyeball the sweet potato to decide what would fit into a can.

Cook a sweet potato (steam, boil, bake, whatever) and let cool a little bit.

2 packages yeast

1 cup warm water

1/2 cup sugar

1/2 cup shortening

1 egg

1-1/2 tsp. salt

5 to 5-1/2 cups flour

Dissolve yeast, let stand 5 minutes. Beat in sweet potatoes, sugar, shortening, egg, salt, and 3 cups flour. Add enough flour to make stiff dough. Knead. Place in greased bowl. Let rise until double. Punch down.

Divide into thirds.

Onto a floured board, roll each out into 12” circle.

Melt 3 Tbsp. butter and brush each round of dough with  butter.

Cut each circle into 12 wedges. I use a sharp knife or a pizza cutter.

Roll up from wide end and place, pointed end down, 2” apart on greased baking sheets (or parchment covered, as seen here).

Cover and let rise until double.

Bake at 375° for 13-15 minutes or until golden.

Makes 36 rolls.