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This recipe is based upon the one found in Electric Bread (Innovative Cooking Enterprises, 1991) written by Suzan Nightingale. I haven’t used a bread machine in years, but I’ve adapted the recipe to my stand mixer and oven. It really works! Make sure your sourdough starter is active. Most people don’t have 2 cups of it at the ready, so planning may be involved. The last couple of times I made this, I doubled the recipe.

  • Ingredients
  • 3 tsp. active dry yeast (or instant)
  • 2 cups sourdough starter
  • 2 Tbsp. sugar
  • 2 Tbsp. powdered milk
  • 1-1/2 tsp. salt
  • 2 Tbsp. butter
  • 2-3 cups flour

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook, stir together the yeast, sourdough starter, and sugar. Once the yeast has started to dissolve, stir in the powdered milk, salt, butter, and 1-1/2 cups flour. Turn the machine on low and let it mix for 5-8 minutes to build the gluten. Start adding flour a little at a time until the dough comes away from the sides of the bowl and clings to the hook. The dough should feel smooth and elastic. Remove the dough hook and cover the bowl. Let sit in a warm place for a couple hours or so, until the dough has doubled in size. Punch it down and form into one loaf. Spray or grease a 9×5″ loaf pan and set the dough into the pan. Let rise in a warm spot until it rises level with the top of the loaf pan. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake at 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes. Bread should sound hollow when tapped and it should be a golden color all over.

When I made this last week, I doubled the recipe. After the first rise, I placed both loaves into loaf pans. One loaf I let rise and the other loaf I placed into the freezer. Once it was frozen, I removed it from the pan and wrapped it tightly in plastic cling wrap. According to sources on the Internet, I should be able to take it out of the freezer, put it into a loaf pan, let it thaw and then rise like usual, and then bake. I’m hoping that works. I’m awash in sourdough and don’t eat that much bread.