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I usually, not always, use Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin for my jam. The recipe booklet that I use is from 1975 when the liquid pectin came in bottles. Now the pectin comes in sealed envelopes and each envelope is equivalent to one half-bottle. As you can see, my recipe booklet is falling apart. The new recipe sheet that comes inside the packages now isn’t as comprehensive as the old one. I do not water-bath can my jam. There is enough sugar in it to act as a preservative. Using canning lids keeps air from getting in. When I was a child, my mother only used paraffin to cover the jam and many people still do it that way.

  • This is how I prep for a jam-making session
  • Set out enough sanitized jars and rings to match the yield of the recipe, either pints, cups, or half-cups.
  • Put the appropriate number of lids into a small saucepan of water over low heat.
  • Set out my canning funnel, a ladle, metal serving spoon, and small dish.
  • Cut open the envelope of Certo and set it in the small dish.
  • [The small dish is for the foam (which is just as delicious as the jam, only foamy)]
  • Strawberry or Blackberry or Dewberry or Boysenberry or Youngberry Jam
  • Yield 8 cups (5 lb.)
  • 4 cups prepared fruit (about 2 qt. fully ripe berries)*
  • 7 cups (3 lb.) sugar
  • 1 envelope Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin

First, prepare fruit. Crush completely, one layer at a time, about 2 quarts fully ripe berries. (If desired, sieve half of pulp to remove some of the seeds.) Measure 4 cups into a very LARGE saucepan. *(With strawberries, or other berries lacking tartness, use 3-3/4 cups fruit and add 1/4 cup lemon juice.) Stir in sugar and mix well.

Over high heat, bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; at once stir in Certo. Skim the foam off with a metal spoon. Continue to stir and skim. Ladle into jars, leaving 1/2″ room at the top.

Wipe the rims of the jars and screw on the lids. Turn the jars upside down for at least thirty minutes (or as long as hours and hours–doesn’t matter). If the fruit is floating, give the jars a shake every once in awhile. Turn the jars right side up and let cool completely before marking and storing.

Many times it can take more than a day for the jam to set. Try not to worry. If it really does not set, then you have a nice batch of syrup or you can try to process it again. I have never done that, I just go the syrup route. C’est la vie.

I usually, not always, use Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin for my jelly. The recipe booklet that I use is from 1975 when the liquid pectin came in bottles. Now the pectin comes in sealed envelopes and each envelope is equivalent to one half-bottle. As you can see, my recipe booklet is falling apart. The new recipe sheet that comes inside the packages now isn’t as comprehensive as the old one. I do not water-bath can my jelly. There is enough sugar in it to act as a preservative. Using canning lids keeps air from getting in. When I was a child, my mother only used paraffin to cover the jelly and many people still do it that way.

  • This is how I prep for a jelly-making session
  • Set out enough sanitized jars and rings to match the yield of the recipe, either pints, cups, or half-cups.
  • Put the appropriate number of lids into a small saucepan of water over low heat.
  • Set out canning funnel, ladle, metal serving spoon, and small dish.
  • Cut open the envelope of Certo and set it in the small dish.
  • [The small dish is for the foam (which is just as delicious as the jam, only foamy)]
  • Currant Jelly: Yield 7-1/4 cups (5-1/2 lb.)
  • 5 cups prepared juice (about 4 lb. fully ripe red currants)
  • 7 cups (3 lb.) sugar
  • 1 envelope Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin

First, prepare juice. Crush about 4 lb. (3 quarts) fully ripe red currants. Add 1 cup water; bring to a boil and simmer, covered, 10 minutes. Place in jelly bag; squeeze out juice. Measure 5 cups into a very LARGE saucepan. Add sugar and mix well.

Place over high heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. At once stir in Certo. Then bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat, skim off foam with a metal spoon, and pour quickly into jars.

Wipe the rims of the jars and screw on the lids. Turn the jars upside down for at least thirty minutes (or as long as hours and hours–doesn’t matter). Turn the jars right side up and let cool completely before marking and storing.

Many times it can take more than a day for jelly to set. Try not to worry. If it really does not set, then you have a nice batch of syrup or you can try to process it again. I have never done that, I just go the syrup route. C’est la vie.

I could eat this peach jam out of the jar with a spoon, and have done so! I haven’t tried the pear jam, but it’s the same recipe so I included it in case you want to try it. One time the local grocery store was selling cases of bruised cooking peaches for a very low price. I thought I had died and gone to heaven. We had peachy desserts for quite a few days, along with this delicious peach jam.

  • Peach or Pear Jam
  • Yield: 9 cups (5-1/2 lb.)
  • 4 cups prepared fruit (about 3 lb. fully ripe peaches or pears)
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice
  • 7-1/2 cups (3-1/4 lb.) sugar
  • 1 envelope Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin

First, prepare fruit. Peel and pit fully ripe peaches; core fully ripe pears. Grind or chop very fine. Measure 4 cups into a very LARGE saucepan. Add lemon juice. Stir in sugar and mix well.

Place over high heat, bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; at once stir in Certo. Skim off foam with a metal spoon. Ladle into jars, leaving 1/2″ headspace.

Wipe the rims of the jars and screw on the lids. Turn the jars upside down for at least thirty minutes (or as long as hours and hours–doesn’t matter). If the fruit is floating, give the jars a shake every once in awhile. Turn the jars right side up and let cool completely before marking and storing.

Notes: I usually, not always, use Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin for my jam. The recipe booklet that I use is from 1975 when the liquid pectin came in bottles. Now the pectin comes in sealed envelopes and each envelope is equivalent to one half-bottle. As you can see, my recipe booklet is falling apart. The new recipe sheet that comes inside the packages now isn’t as comprehensive as the old one. I do not water-bath can my jam. There is enough sugar in it to act as a preservative. Using canning lids keeps air from getting in. When I was a child, my mother only used paraffin to cover the jam and many people still do it that way.

  • This is how I prep for a jam-making session
  • Set out enough sanitized jars and rings to match the yield of the recipe, either pints, cups, or half-cups.
  • Put the appropriate number of lids into a small saucepan of water over low heat.
  • Set out my canning funnel, a ladle, metal serving spoon, and small dish.
  • Cut open the envelope of Certo and set it in the small dish.
  • [The small dish is for the foam (which is just as delicious as the jam, only foamy)]

What do you do with this? Well, it goes good with lamb and also makes a beautiful presentation in Thumbprint Cookies at Christmastime, along with Raspberry Jam or Currant Jelly.

  • Fresh Mint Jelly
  • Yield: 3-1/4 cups (2-1/2 lb.)
  • 1-3/4 cups mint infusion (1-1/2 cups fresh mint)
  • 2 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • Green food coloring (optional)
  • 3-1/2 cups (1-1/2 lb.) sugar
  • 1 envelope Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin

First, prepare mint infusion. Wash 1-1/2 cups firmly packed mint leaves and stems. Place in a large saucepan and crush with a masher or glass. Add 2-1/4 cups water and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover, and let stand 10 minutes. Strain. Measure 1-3/4 cups into saucepan. Add lemon juice and a few drops of green food coloring if you decided to use it. Stir in sugar and mix well.

Place over high heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. At once stir in Certo. Then bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat, skim off foam with a metal spoon, and pour quickly into jars.

Wipe the rims of the jars and screw on the lids. Turn the jars upside down for at least thirty minutes (or as long as hours and hours–doesn’t matter). Turn the jars right side up and let cool completely before marking and storing.

Many times it can take more than a day for the jelly to set. Try not to worry. If it really does not set, then you have a nice batch of syrup or you can try to process it again. I have never done that, I just go the syrup route. C’est la vie.

I usually, not always, use Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin for my jelly. The recipe booklet that I use is from 1975 when the liquid pectin came in bottles. Now the pectin comes in sealed envelopes and each envelope is equivalent to one half-bottle. My recipe booklet is falling apart. The new recipe sheet that comes inside the packages now isn’t as comprehensive as the old one. I do not water-bath can my jelly. There is enough sugar in it to act as a preservative. Using canning lids keeps air from getting in. When I was a child, my mother only used paraffin to cover the jelly and many people still do it that way.

  • This is how I prep for a jelly-making session
  • Set out enough sanitized jars and rings to match the yield of the recipe, either pints, cups, or half-cups.
  • Put the appropriate number of lids into a small saucepan of water over low heat.
  • Set out my canning funnel, a ladle, metal serving spoon, and small dish.
  • Cut open the envelope of Certo and set it in the small dish.
  • [The small dish is for the foam (which is just as delicious as the jelly, only foamy)]

I usually, not always, use Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin for my jam. The recipe booklet that I use is from 1975 when the liquid pectin came in bottles. Now the pectin comes in sealed envelopes and each envelope is equivalent to one half-bottle. As you can see, my recipe booklet is falling apart. The new recipe sheet that comes inside the packages now isn’t as comprehensive as the old one. I do not water-bath can my jam. There is enough sugar in it to act as a preservative. Using canning lids keeps air from getting in. When I was a child, my mother only used paraffin to cover the jam and many people still do it that way.

  • This is how I prep for a jam-making session
  • Set out enough sanitized jars and rings to match the yield of the recipe, either pints, cups, or half-cups.
  • Put the appropriate number of lids into a small saucepan of water over low heat.
  • Set out my canning funnel, a ladle, metal serving spoon, and small dish.
  • Cut open the envelope of Certo and set it in the small dish.
  • [The small dish is for the foam (which is just as delicious as the jam, only foamy)]
  • Rhubarb Jam
  • Yield: 6-1/4 cups (4 lb.) jam
  • 3 cups prepared fruit (about 2 lb. rhubarb)
  • 5-1/2 cups (2 lb. 6 oz.) sugar
  • 1 envelope Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin

First, prepare fruit. Slice thin or chop about 2 pounds rhubarb. Put the rhubarb into a medium saucepan, add 3/4 cup water, and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to simmer, covered, until the rhubarb is soft — about 1 minute. Measure 3 cups into a LARGE pan. Add sugar to pan and mix well.

Over high heat, bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; at once stir in Certo. Skim the foam off with a metal spoon. Continue to stir and skim. Ladle into jars, leaving 1/2″ room at the top.

Wipe the rims of the jars and screw on the lids. Turn the jars upside down for at least thirty minutes (or as long as hours and hours–doesn’t matter). If the fruit is floating, give the jars a shake every once in awhile. Turn the jars right side up and let cool completely before marking and storing.

Many times it can take more than a day for the jam to set. Try not to worry. If it really does not set, then you have a nice batch of syrup or you can try to process it again. I have never done that, I just go the syrup route. C’est la vie.

I usually, not always, use Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin for my jam. The recipe booklet that I use is from 1975 when the liquid pectin came in bottles. Now the pectin comes in sealed envelopes and each envelope is equivalent to one half-bottle. My recipe booklet is falling apart. The new recipe sheet that comes inside the packages now isn’t as comprehensive as the old one. I do not water-bath can my jam. There is enough sugar in it to act as a preservative. Using canning lids keeps air from getting in. When I was a child, my mother only used paraffin to cover the jam and many people still do it that way. I have heard that you should not increase the recipe and/or cut the amount of sugar, something about cooking time and setting and preserving. So, stick to the recipe.

  • This is how I prep for a jam-making session
  • Set out enough sanitized jars and rings to match the yield of the recipe, either pints, cups, or half-cups.
  • Put the appropriate number of lids into a small saucepan of water over low heat.
  • Set out my canning funnel, a ladle, metal serving spoon, and small dish.
  • Cut open the envelope of Certo and set it in the small dish.
  • [The small dish is for the foam (which is just as delicious as the jam, only foamy)]
  • Rhubarb-Strawberry Jam
  • Yield: 6-1/4 cups (4 lb.) jam
  • 3-1/2 cups prepared fruit (about 1 lb. rhubarb and 1 quart strawberries)
  • 6-1/2 cups (2 lb. 6 oz.) sugar
  • 1 envelope Certo Liquid Fruit Pectin

Slice one pound rhubarb and put into saucepan. Add 1/4 cup water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and let simmer until rhubarb is soft, about 1 minute. Thoroughly crush about 1 quart fully ripe strawberries. Mix the fruits together and measure out 3-1/2 cups. Place the fruit in a LARGE pan. Add sugar to pan and mix well.

Over high heat, bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; at once stir in Certo. Skim the foam off with a metal spoon. Continue to stir and skim. Ladle into jars, leaving 1/2″ room at the top.

Wipe the rims of the jars and screw on the lids. Turn the jars upside down for at least thirty minutes (or as long as hours and hours–doesn’t matter). If the fruit is floating, give the jars a shake every once in awhile. Turn the jars right side up and let cool completely before marking and storing.

Many times it can take more than a day for the jam to set. Try not to worry. If it really does not set, then you have a nice batch of syrup or you can try to process it again. I have never done that, I just go the syrup route. C’est la vie.

This recipe originates with Jamie Oliver. It is gluten-free. I have made it many times and it’s incredibly delicious. My blog has turned into a place for me to remember how I did something in case the recipe goes away at the original site. That really happens a lot. So, my pictures are awful. But rest assured, the food is good!

  • Ingredient List
  • One whole chicken
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2-3 Tbsp. butter and equal amount olive oil
  • 2-1/2 cups milk
  • Zest of two lemons
  • One handful fresh sage leaves, whole
  • 8 cloves garlic, whole or smashed

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Pat chicken dry and rub with olive oil. Sprinkle inside and out with salt and pepper. In a Dutch oven or large pot, heat butter and olive oil over medium-high heat. Brown chicken on all sides.

Remove chicken to plate. Drain fat from pan. Add milk, lemon zest, garlic cloves, and sage leaves. Return chicken to pan. Cover the pan and bake at 375 degrees F, covered, for 45 minutes. Remove the lid and continue baking, uncovered, for 45 minutes.

Remove the chicken to a plate and let cool enough to handle. Stir and scrape the curdled milk product in the pan. Remove the bigger sage leaves and discard them.

Pull the meat off the bones of the chicken and serve it with the “sauce” in bowls over mashed potatoes or polenta or rice or mashed cauliflower, whatever or nothing.

I’ve got herbs growing on my back deck for the first time. And included in those herbs is sage. It was so nice to just pick what I needed instead of wondering whether or not the store would have fresh sage. On this day I served the chicken dish over Creamy Cheesy Baked Polenta, but I’ve also served it over Twice-Baked Cauliflower.

This recipe originates at Taste of Home. It satisfies both your sweet tooth and your chocolate craving in three layers. There is no baking involved, so it makes a great summertime treat.

  • First Layer
  • 1 cup butter
  • 1/2 cup baking cocoa
  • 1 egg yolk, room temperature
  • 2 cups graham cracker crumbs (I crushed one packet)
  • 1/2 cup powdered sugar (confectioners’ sugar)
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract or paste

Prepare a 9×13″ pan by spraying with non-stick spray or greasing.

In a large saucepan over medium heat, melt butter and stir in baking cocoa. Stir over heat until mixture is smooth. Temper the egg yolk by whisking a little of the hot mixture into the egg yolk, continue whisking and add a bit more hot mixture. Then stir the egg yolk mix into the butter/cocoa in the saucepan. Continue stirring constantly over medium heat for 2-3 minutes until mixture thickens. Remove from heat and stir in graham cracker crumbs, powdered sugar, and vanilla. Stir until well mixed. Press into the prepared pan and refrigerate until the next layer is ready.

  • Second Layer
  • 1/2 cup melted butter
  • 1/3 cup Kahlua
  • 3 cups powdered sugar

Stir Kahlua into melted butter until well mixed. Stir in powdered sugar. Spread over First Layer (it’s okay if it’s still warm). Refrigerate until set.

  • Third Layer
  • 1/4 cup butter, cubed
  • 3 oz. semi-sweet chocolate chips

Melt together until smooth. Spread over top of the chilled and set Second Layer. Refrigerate until set.

Cut into serving pieces and serve!

Store in refrigerator.

I want to put this on the blog so I can remember what I did because these turned out awesome and are easy to make. It was my first time making them myself. I’ve eaten them many times. All in all, I approached this with a great deal of trepidation, but it turned out to be a lot easier than I thought and I’m well-pleased with the results. It’s something I should make again. I put a lot of notes at the end.

  • Ingredient List
  • 1-2 Tbsp. cooking oil
  • 1 lb. ground pork
  • 1/2 cup minced onion
  • 3 minced garlic cloves
  • 1/2 cup shredded carrot
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced cabbage
  • 1/2 cup chopped green onion
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 Tbsp. soy sauce
  • Lumpia wrappers (14-15 should do it), thawed
  • Cooking oil for frying
  • Sweet Chili Sauce

Coat the bottom of a skillet with cooking oil and fry the ground pork until no longer pink. Remove from skillet to bowl. Strain off, and discard, all but a couple tablespoons of fat. In the skillet, stir fry onion and garlic until onion is translucent. Stir in vegetables, cooked pork, salt and pepper, and soy sauce. Keep the skillet over heat just a little while to soften the vegetables slightly. They will continue cooking off the heat. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature.

Set a lumpia wrapper in front of you and place about 3 Tbsp. of filling near the bottom of the wrapper sheet. Roll up a little way, then fold in the sides to make an envelope. Dap the remaining wrapper edge with water and continue rolling. Check to make sure the seam is sealed.

Set the roll onto a plate and go onto the next one. Once you’re finished with the rolls, heat about 1/2-1″ oil in a skillet medium-hot. Using tongs set lumpia into oil. Turn to another side once the first side is brown and continue this way until the roll is brown all over. Remove from skillet and set on paper towels to soak extra oil. Wait till they cool off a little before dipping in Sweet Chili Sauce and wolfing down.

  • NOTES
  • I use real lumpia wrappers. They are round, about 8″ diameter. They came in a box that was supposed to be frozen, but was thawed by the time it got into my house. I kept the box in the refrigerator for a couple days and they worked just fine. There was no indication of how many were in the box, but my estimate is more than 30. This recipe made 14 lumpia. Lumpia wrappers are incredibly thin. I watched a video of how they’re made and basically the dough is just smeared across the frying pan and then peeled off. Thank goodness the box of wrappers has plastic between each wrapper. The plastic sheet may be thicker than the lumpia wrapper itself.
  • Online I’ve seen that many people use egg-roll wrappers instead of lumpia wrappers. I cannot speak to that as I’ve never tried it.
  • The good reason for using cooked filling ingredients, rather than raw, is that you can fry the lumpia quickly and get that nice crispy outside texture without worry that the meat is cooked through on the inside. The frying part of this went very, very quickly on a fairly high oil temperature.
  • Once you dab water on the lumpia wrapper you need to finish rolling it immediately or the wrapper disintegrates. Just sayin’.
  • My friend who makes these a lot uses pork, carrots, cabbage, and french-cut green beans. The filling recipe is flexible and I think every family has their own way of doing it.
  • I read online someone said the filling is easier to work with if it’s been refrigerated. That sounds right. I think you’d end up with more uniform rolls and could make them larger.
  • Also, I read that you can very easily freeze the lumpia rolls before you fry them, just make sure to separate with wax paper or something like that so they won’t stick to each other. Don’t thaw first, but be careful of spatter while you’re frying frozen food. You might have to fry at a lower temperature, too, but I’m not sure as I have not tried this.
  • Lumpia was our dinner and two of us ate a dozen of them.